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Salivary Estradiol

Technical Summary

Analyte Summary
Analyte: Estradiol
Aliases: 17β-estradiol, E2, 1,3,5(10)-estratriene-3,17β-diol
Serum-Saliva Correlation: 0.80
Optimum Collection Volume: 225 μL*
*Add 300 µl to the total volume of all tests for liquid handling
Assay Summary
Methodology: ELISA
Sensitivity: 0.1 pg/mL
Assay Range: 1 pg/mL - 32 pg/mL
Assay Type: Quantitative

Collect Saliva Samples

ESTRADIOL SALIVA COLLECTION CONSIDERATIONS

Better results begin with better saliva collection. This collection protocol features general considerations to maximize salivary ​Estradiol analysis. Use this analyte specific collection protocol to plan your collection methodology and sampling schemes.

APPROVED SALIVARY ESTRADIOL COLLECTION METHODS

Test Saliva Samples

@ Salimetrics
Salimetrics SalivaLab - Easy & Accurate
Order Code (lab): 5160
Transport Requirements: Ship on Dry Ice

Add DNA Analysis to My Study

Considerations for adding Salivary DNA to analyte Studies:

You can combine salivary analytes with easy, accurate, and affordable genomic testing using Salimetrics SalivaLab and the same sample that you are already collecting – no specialized saliva collection devices or additional samples are required.

Don’t know what SNPs are right for you? The SalivaLab’s DNA team specializes in genetic testing services, we recommend you Request a DNA Consult (gratis) to learn more about common considerations such as # of samples, participant ethnicity, and IRB Approval.

All DNA Services

DNA Extraction and Normalization
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Genotyping
VNTR & STR Analysis

References & Salivary Estradiol Research

    1. Abraham, G.E. (1975). The applications of steroid radioimmunoassay to gynecologic endocrinology. In: Taymor, M.L. and Green, T.H. (eds.): Progress in gynecology, Vol. 1, 111-144. New York: Grune and Stratton.
    2. Faiman, C., Winter, S.D., & Reyes, F.I. (1976). Patterns of gonadotropins and gonadal steroids throughout life. Clin Obstet Gynecol, 3(3), 467-483.
    3. Kirschner, M.A., Schneider, G., Ertel, N.H., Worton, E. (1982).  Obesity, androgens, estrogens, and cancer risk.  Cancer Res, 42 (8 suppl), 3281s-3285s.
    4. Labrie, F., Bélanger, A., Cusan, L., Candas, B. (1997).  Physiological changes in dehydroepiandrosterone are not reflected by serum levels of active androgens and estrogens but of their metabolites: Intracrinology.  J Clin Endocrinol Metab, 82(8), 2403-9.
    5. Lipson, S.F., & Ellison, P.T. (1996). Comparison of salivary steroid profiles in naturally occurring conception and non-conception cycles. Hum Reprod, 11(10), 2090-96.
    6. Choe, J.K., Khan-Dawood, F.S., Dawood, M.Y. (1982). Progesterone and estradiol in saliva and plasma during the menstrual cycle. Am J Obstet Gynecol, 146, 557-62.
    7. Bao, A.-M., Liu, R.-Y., van Someren, E.J., et al. (2003).  Diurnal rhythm of free estradiol during the menstrual cycle.  Eur J Endocrinol, 148(2), 227-32.
    8. Chang, R.J., Plouffe Jr., L. Schaffer, K.  Physiology of the menopause. In: Comprehensive management of menopause, Lorrain, J., Flouffe Jr., L., Ravnikar, V., Speroff, L., Watts, N., eds.  New York: Springer, 1993.
    9. Reed, M.J., Lai, L.C., Owen, A.M., et al. (1990).  Effect of treatment with 4-hydroxyandrostenedione on the peripheral conversion of androstenedione to estrone and in vitro tumor aromatase activity in postmenopausal women with breast cancer.  Cancer Res, 50(1), 193-96.
    10. Shirtcliff, E.A., Dahl, R.E., Pollak, S.D. (2009). Pubertal development: Correspondence between hormonal and physical development.  Child Dev, 80(2), 327-37.

    1. Simpson, E.R. (2000). Role of aromatase in sex steroid action.  J Mol Endocrinol, 25(2), 149-56.
    2. Winters, S.J., Troen, P. (1986).  Testosterone and estradiol are co-secreted episodically by the human testis.  J Clin Invest, 78(4), 870-73.
    3. Nankin, H.R., Pinto, R., Fan, D.-F., Troen, P. (1975).  Daytime titers of testosterone, LH, estrone, estradiol, and testosterone-binding protein: Acute effects of LH and LH-releasing hormone in men.  J Clin Endocrinol Metab, 41(2), 271-81.
    4. Ouyang, P., Michos, E.D., Kara, R.H. (2006). Hormone replacement therapy and the cardiovascular system: Lessons learned and unanswered questions.  J Am College Cardiol, 47(9), 1741-53.
    5. McCarthy, M.M. (2008). Estradiol and the developing brain. Physiol Rev, 88(1), 91-134.
    6. Balthazart, J., Cornil, C.A., Taziaux, M., et al. (2006). Rapid changes in production and behavioral action of estrogens. Neuroscience, 138(3), 783-91.
    7. Karpuzoglu, E., Ahmed, S.A. (2006).  Estrogen regulation of nitric oxide and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in immune cells: Implications for immunity, autoimmune diseases, and apoptosis.  Nitric Oxide, 15(3), 177-86.
    8. Colditz, G. A. 1998.  Relationship between estrogen levels, use of hormone replacement therapy, and breast cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst, 90(11), 814-23.
    9. Lépine, J., Audet-Walsh, E., Grégoire, J., et al. (2010)  Circulating estrogens in endometrial cancer cases and their relationship with tissular expression of key estrogen biosynthesis and metabolic pathways.  J Clin Endocinol Metab, 95(6), 2689-98.
    10. Sasano, H., Harada, N. (1998). Intratumoral aromatase in human breast, endometrial, and ovarian malilgnancies.  Endocr  Rev, 19(5), 593-607.
    11. Vining, R.F., & McGinley, R.A. (1987). The measurement of hormones in saliva: Possibilities and pitfalls. J Steroid Biochem, 27(1-3), 81-94.
    12. Choe, J.K., Khan-Dawood, F.S., & Dawood, M.Y. (1983). Progesterone and estradiol in saliva and plasma during the menstrual cycle. Am J Obstet Gynecol, 147(5), 557-62.
    13. Shirtcliff, E.A., Granger, D.A., Schwartz, E.B., et al. (2000). Assessing estradiol in biobehavioral studies using saliva and blood spots: Simple radioimmunoassay protocols, reliability, and comparative validity. Horm Behav, 38(2), 137-47.
    14. Ellison, P.T., Lipson, S.F. (1999). Salivary estradiol–A viable alternative? Fertil Steril, 72(5), 951-52.)